Is there a difference between Landscape and Setting?

I think there is.

But what I think doesn’t matter. On May 21, BWC will be hosting T M Clark, a writer born in Zimbabwe, now calling Queensland home (having also lived in England) to help us understand how writers need to be Inspired by Landscape, rather than settle for using setting as an atmospheric backdrop.TMClark

Bookings are Essential through the Queensland Writers Centre.

As you can imagine, setting features strongly in TM Clark’s books, which are described as African Suspense. Some might think Tina Marie is ‘lucky’ to have first hand knowledge of a landscape we Australians probably consider exotic.

One point might be that we are all living our own exotic lifestyles. We just don’t notice any more.

The other point might be that Landscape is much more than a location, exotic or otherwise. Landscape isn’t a relief painted with broad brushstrokes. It’s not an accessory. It is the living world your characters find themselves in.

Elizabeth George, American Queen of Crime, a writer of mysteries set in England (you might know the Lynley Mysteries), has this to say in her book, Write Away.

On the surface, it would appear that landscape and setting are the same creatures, identical twins given different names just to confuse the beginning writer. This, however, would not be the truth since setting is where a story takes place–including where each scene takes place–while landscape is much broader than that…Landscape in writing implies much the same as that which is implied by the word when it’s used to refer to a location in a country: It is the broad vista into which the writer actually places the individual settings of the novel, sort of like the canvas or other medium onto which a painter has decided to daub color.

“You need to think about the landscape of your book because if you’re able to make the landscape of place real, you can make the land itself real, which gives you a leg up on making the entire novel real for the reader.”

If you want TM Clark’s take on the Inspiration Landscape can lend to your latest MS, make sure to book early.

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AUTHOR SPOTLIGHT: Sandy Curtis

Grievous Harm is doing really well. Back orders piling up. Reprinting to cover the gap.
Mind you, she’s hardly in town these days. Promoting like crazy.

AusRomToday

Author Spotlight: Sandy Curtis

Describe yourself in one word:
Loving

What is your background with regard to writing?
I always loved writing, dabbled in my youth but marriage and kids intervened, then 20 years ago I started to follow my dream again and entered and won short story competitions, wrote feature articles for magazines, a newspaper column, short stories for women’s magazines, then jumped into the full-length novel pool and swam like crazy. My second attempt came second out of 80 entries in the Emma Darcy Award for unpublished romance manuscripts from Australia and New Zealand. New Concepts Publishing published this, along with my next two books, then Pan Macmillan Australia picked up my first romantic suspense novel and published this and the next four in the loosely-linked series. The GCF hit publishers hard and it was a few years before book six was published, this time with Melbourne-based Clan…

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