It’s All Good for Today’s Authors

Which ever way you intend to publish –Justin_Sheedy
*Indie
*Self
*Trad
Whether e-books have peaked and readers really are re-committing to paper –

No matter what your publishing route, it’s all good news for today’s author.  The reading world is your oyster, assuming you have the tools to crack it.

Meet Justin Sheedy.

He knows his oysters, and he’s either built, borrowed or taught himself the tools he needs to get his words out to the world.

As he says, ‘I’ve gone solo, and am still flapping my wings.’ As publishing models continue to change, he’ll have to keep flapping, and we’ll all be there with him.

Justin’s wing flapping has seen him host six sell-out book-signings during 2015, including his last for the year at Dymocks George Street, Sydney (arguably Australia’s Premier Bookstore) with more event planning underway in 2016.

His first book, Goodbye Crackernight (2009), failed to interest publishers – it’s a memoir – yet Justin continues to secure feature spots in broadcast media, most recently  on 7 News Sydney and Radio 2UE.

He’s currently 60% through his fifth book, No Greater Love, Part Three of an Australian historical fiction trilogy begun in 2012 with Nor the Years Condemn, followed by Ghosts of Empire (2013).

He’ll share what he’s learnt at WriteFest 2016

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Words+Music @ Alowishus

GREAT GELATO GROOVE

 

This year we thought, we wondered, we bounced ideas around – and they were bounced back a couple of times (ouch) I’ll tell you – but an idea solidified at last.

Our CRUSH contribution this year would be music based. Why? Cos musos need words, don’t they. And we writers do words, don’t we.

Don’t you love it when that creativity kicks in?  Especially creativity spurred on by a little healthy chaos.

Part one of our musical connection was a night of education and entertainment at Alowishus Delicious with Undercover Experience. We wanted to know a little about the inner workings of the musician’s mind.

Outcomes:

  • great crowd of non-writers.
  • great crowd of frustrated lyricists.
  • lots of gelato eaten (it was free) , and dinners enjoyed.
  • Some dancing.
  • lyricists got to chat with musos.
  • writers shared their lyrics.
  • connections were made.
  • Our band decided to come to the Workshop, on Sunday 5.

The experience was loud. Then it was bluesy. Then it was improv around some poems clutched in hot sweaty trepidatious hands of writers club members.

To Tracey (who opened Alowishus up to us and got behind the idea), to Undercover Experience (who really caught onto the idea of being playful) and to our President, Jen (who did a great job of shepherding) a great big sloppy thanks from us all.

More about the Workshop on Sunday soon, but of course the Lyrics  Competition doesn’t close until Oct 17.  Register your entry now.

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Hustling Hinkler

Dr Darryl Dymock shares his story of publication in a blog on the Queensland Writers Centre website.

One of his milestones was attending WriteFest and scoring an interview with senior agent, Sophie Hamley, based on his 30 page submission. Her advice and guidance led Darryl on the path to re-write his young adult novel into the non-fiction narrative Hustling Hinkler: the short tumultuous life of a trail-blazing Australian aviator.

Hustling Hinkler will be published by Hachette Australia on 30 July, and will be launched at River Bend Books in Brisbane on 9 August.

Darryl has been invited to talk about Hustling Hinkler at the Bundaberg Library at 11am on Saturday, 24 August.

Congratulations to Darryl from all at the Bundaberg Writers’ Club and the WriteFest committee. It’s inspiring to learn that a prior WriteFest attendee has gone on to attain publication.

Check out Hustling Hinkler on the Hachette Australia website.

 

2013 WriteFest Review by Kez (Kerrie) Salaün

This was my first attendance at WriteFest in Bundaberg. I was excited before I arrived, and doubly so after the evening with author Sulari Gentill on the Thursday night at the (recently refurbished) Bundaberg Library.

Sulari’s talk was both intimate and instructive and we laughed along with her reflections on a writer’s life. To capture an audience personally and professionally is not a skill all speakers achieve easily. I noted the well-coordinated nods of most attendees’ heads agreeing with Sulari. All of us appeared to have experienced similar frustration and joy as writers, or even as family of a writer.

Sulari convinced us that if we dare, if we have the desire, we will certainly achieve. Writing is not just a passion; it is life for most of us. So it is fantastic to find people who live to help writers.

… I was fortunate to be part of Deonie Fiford’s Masterclass on the Saturday.  Having only ever sat anonymously amongst two hundred or more people at one other festival, this expected interaction excited and frightened me. How wrong I was to be afraid.

People in my class had published their writing, some more than once. Others had entered and won contests or, like myself, had little experience as writers. Every single person offered their wisdom with valid personal points of view, sharing the bond of writing.

Deonie Fiford is a woman of many talents. As an editor and publisher she presented her workshops professionally and with humour by affirming and constituting what we all hope to achieve.  In easy terms and with great examples, Deonie showed us how to make our work more dynamic. She used informative written and group exercises that were fun to do. Class sizes were such that everyone’s questions were answered because she spent enough time with each person.

… For me these were four days of communication, connection and learning. The passion for writing IS a drug. My passion for WriteFest is now an addiction.

… Thank you to all the people involved in producing such a brilliant one-day writers extravaganza, that became so much more. I will be there next year, with more ‘bells on’ and less shoes and clothes – so there is more room in my bag for books!

– Kez Salaün